Book Review: Coprophilia by Tim Friesenhahn

Screenshot_20211203-073157_Acrobat for Samsung

Title: Coprophilia

Author: Tim Friesenhahn

Release date: November 13, 2021

**Trigger Warnings a Plenty Here!**

Coprophilia – noun – abnormal interest and pleasure in feces and defecation.

**Normally, I’d share the cover as both the featured photo as well as the main cover up top there, but due to the extreme content, I’ve held off and will have it lower.**

Big thanks to Tim for sending a digital copy over to me. From what I understand, Amazon has banned the book, so you can get digital copies on Godless (link at the end as always with my reviews here) and I’m not too sure about physical copies.

Whenever I get a book to review, I approach it with as much fairness as I can. I want to love every single book, but the reality is you can’t. Just last night I DNF’d a book that will undoubtedly be on many people’s year end ‘Best Of’ Lists. That’s ok.

With EXTREME horror (and yes I put this in all-caps. Every horror book has extremity in it, hence the idea of the subgenre’s within) I typically approach it by looking for the ‘why’ and the symbolism.

Case in point – I’ve read Matthew Stokoe’s ‘Cows,’ and was blown away by the symbolism, the despair and the metaphoric look at how the main character was searching for acceptance, hope, love and ultimately control.

All too often in EXTREME horror, the books are written purely to disgust and repulse and fair enough. If that’s the author’s prerogative, more power to them. What it can often do, for me at least, is have the book fall flat. I can’t root for anyone, can’t hope for someone’s survival and can’t understand the ‘why’ when certain things are done or happen. No connection for this reader means no enjoyment, typically.

So it was, that I approached ‘Coprophilia’ by Tim Friesenhahn in the same manor. I personally, have zero trigger issues. I can read whatever and have no reaction, but I understand why other’s do.

The story is repulsive and disgusting, but, much like ‘Cows,’ that aspect is used to cover the reality that this is a story about two people who’ve been abused horrifically. If I had to relate this to any movies, I’d say it had elements of ‘Hostel’ and ‘The Human Centipede’ as well as dipping its toes into the same waters as ‘A Serbian Tale.’

What I liked: The story follows Paige, a man who was abused as a child by one of his father’s girlfriends and has a number of issues that he hasn’t sought professional help over. After falling for a woman and getting quickly married, those issues rear up and he flees, only to be seduced, drugged and captured by Deleyza. You see, Deleyza, this young, gorgeous woman, is out being her own ‘Dexter.’ Seeking out pedophiles and rapists, seducing them and then torturing them, until she decides to kill them. She too has been abused, and it’s through this shared connection that Paige finds himself falling for her, even as he witnesses and is involved in some horrible, horrible acts.

I really enjoyed watching how Paige internally struggled with his outward revulsion to what was happening and just how depraved Deleyza was, with his inward understanding that she was broken, just like him and that maybe together they could make things work.

As the story unfolds, Friesenhahn gives us many twists and turns, and they ultimately push Paige to the absolute limit of what he believes, but also what he can accept. The ending showcases that inner turmoil and with an epilogue added on, I’d say half of that epilogue added to their relationship and showed how they’d connected.

What I didn’t like: There were a number of issues I had and I’ll try my best to remain spoiler free but also constructive. First up – there is a very jarring POV shift shortly after the book starts. The book begins following Deleyza and showcasing her ‘why’ of her depravity. Suddenly, the book switches to 1st person POV from Paige’s perspective (where it remains for the rest of the book until the epilogue), which really threw me off. I’d believed at first it was going to be following Deleyza, so the switch to Paige didn’t feel natural.

Secondly, the coprophilia aspect also just sort of arrives. We never do get much of a back story as to why  Deleyza has this urge. We learn about the first time it happened and the underlying threat she felt by who was doing this act, but there wasn’t a connection between that act and why she fell so hard for this addiction. Unlike in ‘Cows,’ which really showcased the reason, this act didn’t have the depth of symbolism I was hoping it could have. The character being broken down and made to debase themselves with an act lesser than low, of being made to love something that we’re told from a very young age is wrong and disgusting. I think if that could’ve been sorted a bit or expanded upon, we really could’ve seen it used as a device to elevate these two characters from scum to lovers.

Lastly, I felt half of the epilogue was good to close the story off but the other half felt a bit forced. There’s this other element introduced, that hadn’t been discussed once before, it was just there near the house and it almost felt like it was added purely as a potential sequel/follow up piece, which really dampened a lot of the growth we’d seen in these characters.

Why you should buy this: If you’re an EXTREME horror fan and you frequent the Godless sight, you’ll most likely have come across this. If you’re looking for the grossest of the gross, the depravity and sickness of a story that is unhinged and an escape, you’ll most likely really enjoy this.

If you’re a horror fan who likes to dabble in the EXTREME extreme side, I think this one’ll be a miss for you.

It’s a fast read, filled with tension and a number of questions that will make you wanting to find out more. Tim’s done a great job of giving these characters depth when some of the story works to limit how much connection we have with them.

3/5

**** Here is the Godless buy link;

Coprophilia by Tim Friesenhahn

**** Here is the full cover art uncensored ****

Screenshot_20211203-075253_Acrobat for Samsung

2 thoughts on “Book Review: Coprophilia by Tim Friesenhahn

  1. OMGosh, THAT’s what she’s eating on the cover? Ew.:-) I do read extreme horror, and I could read a story with this subject matter, but the POV issue and the disjointed epilogue would frustrate me. Good review!

    Like

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